3D-Printed ‘Bump Key’ Can Open Almost Any Lock

TechCrunch

Bump keys are primitive tools used by locksmiths (and HAXoRZ) to knock open simple locks. Until now, many locks were secure simply because they were too complex to be bumped and, as a result, you had a bit of security by obscurity. That’s all changing.

Created by Jos Weyers and Christian Holler, these keys are designed to knock or bump the pins in a standard lock into place after a few sharp raps with a hammer. The pair discovered how to 3D print a piece of plastic that will fit into the keyhole based on a photo of the hole itself. A few carefully cut notches in the plastic and you’ve got a usable bump key.

The video below shows how it works – and how simple it is to use.

The pair don’t want us to break into secure military installations with their tool. Instead, they want to show…

View original post 36 more words

Digital Panic! No, Facebook is Not Spying on You Through Their Messenger App

UPDATE 05/01/12: For those of you searching for information about the “Copyright Meme” hoax of January 2015, I have written a new post dealing more specifically with that incident, but also drawing heavily from the warnings and advice I give here regarding having a healthy level of skepticism when it comes to Facebook status updates, and how to actually protect your digital self, see “Digital Panic 2.0! Facebook Are Still Not Going To Steal Your Copyright / Identity / Soul!” 

Just because the fourth instance of people reacting to the changes regarding the Facebook app and Facebook messenger app has come to my attention, I think I should make this clear; Articles and posts saying that Facebook can now spy on you and take pictures of you are sensationalist nonsense. There are a lot of people deleting the Facebook messenger app, and exhorting their comrades to do likewise in a fit of data-security-conscious zeal…. Perhaps missplaced zeal though, as to people like me, the “changes” in these app permissions don’t seem all that new or nearly as evil as they have been portrayed. If you already use the normal Facebook app, or even use Facebook at all, the permissions you are giving for the messenger app are really nothing new. If you’re truly worried about data protection and misuse of data, don’t use Facebook. My first piece of advice is that you read the Snopes.com page on this latest situation – “Facebook Messenger“. Indeed, any time you read something online which you think sounds a bit over the top, you should most definitely check Snopes to get a better idea of how well researched these ideas are. Continue reading Digital Panic! No, Facebook is Not Spying on You Through Their Messenger App

The World Of Everything-As-A-Service

TechCrunch

Editor’s note: Tom Blomfield is a Ruby developer and co-founder of GoCardless (YC S11). He was named one of the Top 5 Entrepreneurs under 30 in Europe and blogs at tomblomfield.com.

Over the last few years, it’s become dramatically more simple and capital-efficient to launch and grow Internet businesses. In particular, “X-as-a-Service” providers help startups get off the ground with only a few hundred dollars. Amazon and Rackspace provide on-demand servers that scale to meet hosting requirements, Mailchimp and Sendgrid run high-performance mail servers at very low cost, while Stripe, Braintree and PayPal make payment processing straightforward.

As companies become more comfortable using these outsourced services, more specialized and niche services can flourish, and so the process of launching startups becomes faster and cheaper. It’s become possible to build billion-dollar companies with a handful of engineers. Thanks to these services and tools, we’ve “decoupled the technical…

View original post 628 more words

Technollama: “Do monkeys dream of electric copyright?”

I just read this very interesting piece by one of my favourite IT Law experts,  Andres Guadamuz, aka “Technollama“,  about the recent confusion regarding copyright for monkey-selfies. Really there are few people as well able to discuss such a ridiculous but technically interesting legal question as Technollama. The piece makes some very interesting analogies between Infopaq and computer-generated work. Well worth your time, especially should you find your photographic equipment commandeered by artistically inclined primates at some point in the near future.

Read it at:

Do Monkeys Dream of Electric Copyright” Technollama

http://www.technollama.co.uk/do-monkeys-dream-of-electric-copyright

Has The Animal-Rights Movement Overlooked Fish?

The Dish

6534584_4ff6a1099f_z

Biologist Culum Brown suggests so:

Every major commercial agricultural system has some ethical laws, except for fish. Nobody’s ever asked the questions: “What does a fish want? What does a fish need?” Part of the problem comes back to the question of whether fish feel pain. But for the last 30 years, the neurophysiologists have known that they do, and haven’t even argued about it. …

I think, ultimately, the revolution will come. But it’ll be slow, because the implications are huge. For example, I can’t think of a way to possibly catch fish from the open ocean in a massive commercial way to meet demand that would be anyway near our standards for ethics if we think of them like other animals. Currently, you go out, you catch a bunch of fish, you crush most of them to death in a net, you trawl them up from…

View original post 104 more words